Carter mediates for peace in the middle-east as Israel massacres a young family at breakfast

Israel massacred a mother and 4 of her small children (ages 6, 4, 3 and 1) as they sat down to breakfast this morning.  At the same time in the USA, where the Bush administration and the main presidential contenders continue to deny Hamas any role in a peace plan, and refuse to listen to Hamas’s recent truce offer, Jimmy Carter wrote an editorial regarding the meeting he had with Hamas leaders and the leaders of Syria and their desires for peace with Israel.

Here is a blurb from the massacre of the morning:

Palestinian medics identified the dead children as sisters Rudina and Hana Abu Meatak, ages 6 and 3; and their brothers 4-year-old Saleh and 15-month-old Mousad. Their mother, Miyasar, was in her late 30s. Her two older children were critically wounded in the strike, the officials said.

“I feel sick. I want to throw up the blood that is boiling inside me, into the face of the occupation,” said Ibrahim Abu Meatak, the children’s 24-year-old half-brother. He said Miyasar Meatak was fixing breakfast for the family when the tank shell struck.

Maj. Avital Leibovich, spokeswoman for the Israeli military, said militants fired at troops from within a residential area.

“It’s another example of the use of civilians as a human shield,” Leibovich said.

http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5jD4YSkDPlclqd9dHvg2f0Ij18zEgD90AQN5G0

Carter, who desires to see this sort of senseless violence cease explains that he would like to play the same sort of mediator role in the middle-east as he did in Nepal recently, with the same sort of good results.

The Carter Center had monitored three Palestinian elections, including one for parliamentary seats in January 2006. Hamas had prevailed in several municipal contests, gained a reputation for effective and honest administration and did surprisingly well in the legislative race, displacing the ruling party, Fatah. As victors, Hamas proposed a unity government with Mahmoud Abbas of Fatah as president and offered to give key ministries to Fatah, including that of foreign affairs and finance.

Hamas had been declared a terrorist organization by the United States and Israel, and the elected Palestinian government was forced to dissolve. Eventually, Hamas gained control of Gaza, and Fatah is “governing” the Israeli-dominated West Bank. Opinion polls show Hamas steadily gaining popularity. Since there can be no peace with Palestinians divided, we at the Carter Center believed it important to explore conditions allowing Hamas to be brought peacefully back into the discussions. (A recent poll of Israelis, who are familiar with this history, showed 64 percent favored direct talks between Israel and Hamas.)

Similarly, Israel cannot gain peace with Syria unless the Golan Heights dispute is resolved. Here again, United States policy is to ostracize the Syrian government and prevent bilateral peace talks, contrary to the desire of high Israeli officials.

Carter was able to extract these points from Hamas:

Hamas will accept any agreement negotiated by Mr. Abbas and Prime Minister Ehud Olmert of Israel provided it is approved either in a Palestinian referendum or by an elected government. Hamas’s leader, Khaled Meshal, has reconfirmed this, although some subordinates have denied it to the press.

When the time comes, Hamas will accept the possibility of forming a nonpartisan professional government of technocrats to govern until the next elections can be held.

Hamas will also disband its militia in Gaza if a nonpartisan professional security force can be formed.

Hamas will permit an Israeli soldier captured by Palestinian militants in 2006, Cpl. Gilad Shalit, to send a letter to his parents. If Israel agrees to a list of prisoners to be exchanged, and the first group is released, Corporal Shalit will be sent to Egypt, pending the final releases.

Hamas will accept a mutual cease-fire in Gaza, with the expectation (not requirement) that this would later include the West Bank.

Hamas will accept international control of the Rafah crossing between Gaza and Egypt, provided the Egyptians and not the Israelis control closing the gates.

In addition, Syria’s president, Bashir al-Assad, has expressed eagerness to begin negotiations with Israel to end the impasse on the Golan Heights. He asks only that the United States be involved and that the peace talks be made public.

Through more official consultations with these outlawed leaders, it may yet be possible to revive and expedite the stalemated peace talks between Israel and its neighbors. In the Middle East, as in Nepal, the path to peace lies in negotiation, not in isolation.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/28/opinion/28carter.html?_r=1&hp=&oref=slogin&pagewanted=print

So much good could come out of following such a path.  Listen ye leaders of the USA!!

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1 Response to “Carter mediates for peace in the middle-east as Israel massacres a young family at breakfast”


  1. 1 morris108 April 29, 2008 at 4:18 pm

    morris108.wordpress.com/2008/04/29/googling-tunnels-warsaw-ghetto/

    http://morris108.wordpress.com/2008/04/29/peace-with-syria/


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