The new soldier’s creed of the US Army and it’s brutality

Originally published 9/17/06:

The Independant’s Robert Fisk has written an interesting article on the, “Warrior Ethos” of the US Army, which has apparently taken the place of the, “Soldier’s Creed” which was written during the Vietnam war to help get rid of the atrocities committed there.  The new version is quite a bit different than the old version and this line of thinking can explain the brutality used by our Army against the so-called enemy.  Here is the new version: 

I am an American soldier.

I am a warrior and a member of a team. I serve the people of the Unites States and live the Army values.

I will always place the mission first.

I will never accept defeat.

I will never quit.

I will never leave a fallen comrade.

I am disciplined, physically and mentally tough, trained and proficient in my warrior tasks and drills. I always maintain my arms, my equipment and myself.

I am an expert and I am a professional. I stand ready to deploy, engage and destroy the enemies of the United States of America in close combat. I am a guardian of freedom and the American way of life.

I am an American soldier.

And here is the old version:

I am an American Soldier.
I am a member of the United States Army — a protector of the greatest nation on earth.
Because I am proud of the uniform I wear, I will always act in ways creditable to the military service and the nation it is sworn to guard.
I am proud of my own organization. I will do all I can to make it the finest unit in the Army.
I will be loyal to those under whom I serve. I will do my full part to carry out orders and instructions given to me or my unit.
As a soldier, I realize that I am a member of a time-honored profession–that I am doing my share to keep alive the principles of freedom for which my country stands.
No matter what the situation I am in, I will never do anything, for pleasure, profit, or personal safety, which will disgrace my uniform, my unit, or my country.
I will use every means I have, even beyond the line of duty, to restrain my Army comrades from actions disgraceful to themselves and to the uniform.
I am proud of my country and its flag.
I will try to make the people of this nation proud of the service I represent, for I am an American Soldier.

Retrieved from “http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._Soldier’s_Creed

Notice how the new version leaves out the honorable sentiments of not disgracing the uniform, and keeping ones fellow soldiers in line from disgracing their country. 

Robert Fisk uses a few examples of US brutality in Afganistan to show how the new creed is part of the mentality used to grow into the monster we sometimes hear about in the Army.

Lagouranis, whose story is powerfully recalled in Goodman’s new book, Static, reported this brutality to a Marine major and a colonel-lawyer from the US Judge Advocate General’s Office. “But they just wouldn’t listen, you know? They wanted numbers. They wanted numbers of terrorists apprehended … so they could brief that to the general.”
The stories of barbarity grow by the week, sometimes by the day. In Canada, an American military deserter appealed for refugee status and a serving comrade gave evidence that when US forces saw babies lying in the road in Fallujah–outrageously, it appears, insurgents sometimes placed them there to force the Americans to halt and face ambush–they were under orders to drive over the children without stopping.

Which is what happens when you always “place the mission first” when you are going to “destroy”–rather than defeat–your enemies. As my American vet put it: “the activities in American military prisons and the hundreds of reported incidents against civilians in Iraq, Afghanistan and elsewhere are not aberrations–they are part of what the US military, according to the ethos, is intended to be. Many other armies behave in a worse fashion than the US Army. But those armies don’t claim to be the “good guys” … I think we need… a military composed of soldiers, not warriors.”

http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article14993.htm

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